Beach House, Fall 2016
experience the coastal rain forest

Beach House, Fall 2016



Many thousands of birds migrated south while we were there.

 
 

note the migrating shore birds

 

This shark-bit dolphin won the prize for most exotic thing to wash up on the beach this trip. I put my glasses on it to demonstrate the size of the bite - the shark must have been 8-10 feet long. 


kitchen window whale watching
 
These two people showed up for a few days to use their phones.

This guy's calling his stock broker saying "Sell everything. Trump might win."
 


Yaquina Head lighthouse.
 

Two gray whales spouting. Not the big white foamy area - the two tiny puffs.

 
 
 

Tibetan Barley Bread - Tassajara Bakery Bread Book
The boule shape is the way to go for the most even cooking. I've been baking TBB since the 70s when I lived in Northern California. If you were lost for a week in a blizzard, this is all you need to eat. The crust tastes like a cookie.


So far my favorite recipe for razor clams. The noodles buffer the strong clam flavor. Four large razors with onions, mushrooms, carrots, and a few Brussels sprouts. Add salt and pepper or tamari or Bragg to taste. Nitsuke towards the end.

This picture begins a walk on The Lake Trail, which is a part of the common area in our beach subdivision. The Pacific Ocean is about 400 yards to the left. This is Hidden Lake.

October was abnormally rainy which gave me a first look at a true coastal rain forest at the height of its nature for being wet and moldy. Storms regularly pound the coast this time of year. Being out in the rain forest in a storm with 40 knot winds rattling trees that clack loudly overhead is pretty exciting. Mushrooms and newts everywhere, mostly poisonous. Every manner of fungi imaginable that devour anything dead. Creepy at night. Beautiful.


These newts are all rough-skinned newts. I hiked this trail at least 30 times previously and never saw one. Now with the wet, they are everywhere ... dining on fungi. Eat one and you die.


But they sure are cute.
 
 
 

Leaf devoured by fungi. In Colorado I can cut a branch and throw it out back and it will last fifty years. Here the same branch would be gone in three.
 
 

note sunglasses for size - I think this is a bolete, but not a tasty type. I am studying the local mushrooms and have a long way to go before I'll eat one I find. One mistake and you die. Going after chanterelles on my next trip.
 

bolete, maybe
 
 

buttschroom - I think it's a death cap - don't eat.
 
 

Honey mushrooms, maybe, which are good to eat if that is what they are. This is in our back yard.
 
 
 
 

Amanita muscaria - do not eat.
 
Image result for delta jet pictures                Back to Colorado.
 
 
 
Came back to a great many leaves and an abnormally late garden season. I am still picking tomatoes and grapes on November 6. The grapes are sweeter now than ever. Update: still eating grapes off the vine - November 12 - thank you, Trump, for global warming. 
 
 
 
 
 The end